Agatha Christie

by Khadija Tauseef  “Very few of us are what we seem.”  Nowhere is this truer than with the case of Dame Agatha Christie, contrary to her public persona, she was a very private person. Her career spanned over fifty years, was a continuous rollercoaster ride. Earning the title of “Queen of Crime”, producing over 80 … Continue reading Agatha Christie

A Literary Voice for the Unheard: The Inspiring Life of Pearl S. Buck

by Holley Snaith “The test of a civilization is in the way that it cares for its helpless members.”  Pearl S. Buck In addition to being the first female writer to win a Pulitzer Prize and Nobel Prize in Literature, Pearl S. Buck was an advocate for civil rights, women’s rights, and a champion for mixed-race … Continue reading A Literary Voice for the Unheard: The Inspiring Life of Pearl S. Buck

Adventures in Marzipan: Princess Margaret of Denmark, Crown Princess Martha of Norway, Crown Princess Astrid of Belgium

By DM Testa While watching Great British Bake-Off contestants struggle with the Prinsesstarta or Princess Cake, a Swedish sponge cake layered with custard, jam, marzipan, and mountains of whipped cream, (yes, please!) I discovered this was a favorite of three sisters from the Swedish Royal family. Even better, there’s a cookbook named after them so … Continue reading Adventures in Marzipan: Princess Margaret of Denmark, Crown Princess Martha of Norway, Crown Princess Astrid of Belgium

Historical food for thought: The way to the public’s heart is through their stomach

by Louise Quick    People love food. It’s not a mind-blowing statement, I know. Eating is an enjoyable - and necessary! - part of human existence. Everyone eats. It’s one of the great common denominators throughout human history. Even Mahatma Ghandi, Jane Austen, Winston Churchill and Boudicca woke up wondering: ‘what’s for breakfast?’. This is what … Continue reading Historical food for thought: The way to the public’s heart is through their stomach

When Duty Comes before Love

by Suzanne Hudson A shocking revelation I love a mystery. There’s something about one that captures my imagination and like a dog with a bone, I can’t let it go until I’ve solved it. You never know when you might stumble across one. On a day trip to Harewood House, in Yorkshire, England, a chance … Continue reading When Duty Comes before Love

Princess Margaret

by Jessica Storoschuk Princess Margaret is very often dismissed by historians, biographers, and royal watchers everywhere. Unfortunately, people see the more dramatic aspects of her personal life and write off everything to do with her. However, this is problematic for a few reasons. Firstly, it is not the historian’s role to make personal judgements about … Continue reading Princess Margaret

Aloha Oe, Hawaii’s Queen

by Laura Klotz Hawaii (to use the common modern spelling) was the 50th territory to be given statehood in the United States. There is no one now living who remembers it as an independent sovereign nation. But a little over a hundred years ago, that’s exactly what it was, and its first queen regnant was … Continue reading Aloha Oe, Hawaii’s Queen

The Netherlands’ Most Stalwart Servant: The Life and Reign of Queen Wilhelmina

by Holley Snaith The official inaugural portrait of the eighteen-year-old Queen Wilhelmina, 1898.Source: Royal Palace Amsterdam “I consider it a great privilege that Mine’s life’s task and duty is to devote all My powers to the welfare and flourishing of My dear Fatherland. The words of My Beloved Father I make Mine: “Orange can never, … Continue reading The Netherlands’ Most Stalwart Servant: The Life and Reign of Queen Wilhelmina

Herstory on Film

Each month, the Herstory Club curates a selection of films that complement our monthly theme. This collection will be female-focused – both in front of the camera and ideally behind too – and range from fiction to biopics of real women in history. The films we’ll be recommending aim to both entertain and educate, showcasing … Continue reading Herstory on Film

‘Fielding the numbers’: Maryam Mirzakhani’s Mathematical Triumph

I’ve always been terrible at maths. Mostly I’d spend class adding numbers together to make funny words if you turned the calculator upside down. I was definitely more interested in history, or being a story writer. Funnily enough, so was Maryam Mirzakhani – the first and only woman to have won the prestigious Field’s Medal for Mathematics.